Pluto's Housewarming
Studio: Disney Release Date : February 12, 1947 Series: Pluto Cartoon
  1. General Info

Cumulative rating: No Ratings Posted

Synopsis

Pluto's brand new beach house is invaded by a wandering turtle, and then Butch the Bulldog, who are both looking for new homes of their own.

Characters

Pluto

Credits

Director

Charles A. Nichols

Animator

George Nicholas
Marvin Woodward
Jerry Hathcock
Blaine Gibson

Story

Eric Gurney
Bill de la Torre

Music

Oliver Wallace

Backgrounds

Maurice Greenberg

Layout

Karl Karpe

Producer

Walter Elias "Walt" Disney

Television

Mickey Mouse Tracks (Season 1, Episode 60)
Donald's Quack Attack (Season 1, Episode 23)

Video Information

VHS

United States

Pluto

Germany

Plutos Tollkühne Abenteuer

France

La Collection en Or des Studios Disney Volume 3
Les Aventures de Pluto

Italy

Pluto
Pluto
Le Avventure di Pluto

CED Disc

United States

Pluto

Laserdisc (CAV)

Japan

Pluto

DVD

United States

The Complete Pluto - Volume 1
Best Pals - Mickey and Pluto

Germany

Disney Treasures : The Complete Pluto Volume 1

Canada

Classic Cartoon Favorites : Volume 12 : Best Pals : Mickey and Pluto

Technical Specifications

MPAA No.: 10975
Running time: 7:01
Animation Type: Standard (Hand-drawn-Cel) Animation
Aspect Ratio: 1.37 : 1
Color Type: Technicolor
Sound Type: Mono: RCA Sound Recording
Print Type: 35mm
Negative Type: 35mm
Cinematographic Format: Spherical
Original Language: English
Original Country: United States

Reviews and Comments

From Ryan :

I enjoy this short, but it isn't one of my favorites. In this short, Pluto has to deal with a turtle who keeps coming into his house. Then, Butch the bulldog invades it and the turtle bites butch, making him run off in agony. I do get a good chuckle at the end where the turtle has his own bed right under Pluto's. The turtle has some bones to munch on as well.

From Baruch Weiss :

I too enjoyed this short, but it's not one of my favorites either. I've seen this plot before in the 1945 classic Canine Patrol.

From Mike :

To me the funniest part of this cartoon is how the turtle manhandles Butch. It's absolutely hilarious.

From Ryan Kilpatrick at The Disney Film Project :

It's hard to believe that we are starting 1947 on Disney Film Project, covering 25 years of Disney films and shorts in about two and a half years. But that’s where we are, as we take a look at Pluto’s Housewarming, the first short in 1947’s slate of Disney projects.

As Pluto shorts go, this one is pretty standard fare, with Pluto trying to move into a new doghouse but getting some resistance along the way. Apparently this new doghouse is right on the beach, so kudos to Pluto for scoring some fine real estate. Seriously, though, the entire background consists of a couple of scenes of sand, which is kind of weird.

The first obstacle to Pluto’s move is a turtle that takes up residence in the house first. The plucky little turtle conveys a sense of attitude and confidence that makes him endearing, even as he is shoving the “hero” of the piece out of the way. It’s a problem that Disney has always had with Pluto.

When Pluto is behaving himself, he’s not that exciting. When Pluto is being a little more mischievous, he is not the hero of the piece so it’s difficult to root for him. So the question becomes how to toe the line between those two things and make Pluto a compelling character? Pluto’s Housewarming does a good job of that with the turtle and then turning right around and introducing someone who is worse than Pluto.

Butch the bulldog returns to the scene in this one, as a squatter in Pluto’s new home. His introduction right in the middle of the short gives a better villain to deal with, but it’s not Pluto who does it. Instead, the turtle takes issue with the bulldog rather than Pluto. This David v. Goliath sort of confrontation adds some real humor and excitement to the proceedings.

It’s fairly easy to see where this is going, right? Pluto and the turtle end up together, because they have a common foe. It makes Pluto more sympathetic and preserves the turtle’s energy from earlier in the short. That’s fun. And it makes Pluto’s Housewarming into an enjoyable, but predictable little short.


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Model Sheet
Submitted by ToonStar95


Screenshots

Submitted by eutychus

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History

5/10/2012

  • Home video info added by eutychus

8/21/2012

  • Credits added by eutychus

11/29/2012

  • Home video info added by eutychus

8/1/2013

  • Television info added by eutychus

8/2/2013

  • Television info added by eutychus

9/19/2013

  • Tech specs added by eutychus

10/22/2015

  • Home video info added by eutychus

10/23/2015

  • Home video info added by eutychus

10/25/2015

  • Home video info added by eutychus

10/30/2015

  • Home video info added by eutychus

11/14/2015

  • Home video info added by eutychus

6/14/2017

  • Credits added by kintutoons32

3/20/2018

  • Gallery items added
  • ToonStar95

4/28/2018

    Sources

    Charles A. Nichols: Director
    • Verified by onscreen credits (not always reliable)

    George Nicholas: Animator
    • Verified by onscreen credits (not always reliable)

    Marvin Woodward: Animator
    • Verified by onscreen credits (not always reliable)

    Jerry Hathcock: Animator
    • Verified by onscreen credits (not always reliable)

    Blaine Gibson: Animator
    • Verified by onscreen credits (not always reliable)

    Eric Gurney: Story
    • Verified by onscreen credits (not always reliable)

    Bill de la Torre: Story
    • Verified by onscreen credits (not always reliable)

    Oliver Wallace: Music
    • Verified by onscreen credits (not always reliable)

    Karl Karpe: Layout
    • Verified by onscreen credits (not always reliable)

    Maurice Greenberg: Backgrounds
    • Verified by onscreen credits (not always reliable)

    Walter Elias "Walt" Disney: Producer
    • Verified by onscreen credits (not always reliable)