Toadette
9 years ago
"Hip Hip-Hurry!" was one of two Road Runner cartoons that used Capitol Hi-Q stock music.

The Latin-name introduction for this cartoon was later used to introduce the 19-minute Road Runner segment in the Bugs Bunny Road-Runner Movie. During this short time, the Capitol stock music can still be heard, before abruptly cutting to the score for "Zoom and Bored".

Did Jones (or WB) have to pay any royalties to Capitol because of the music? Or did a client have to use a certain amount of stock music before payments were required? Or did Capitol not know or (if they did) not care?

The Bugs Bunny Road Runner Movie, after all, has been out on DVD for years, without any problems, but "Hip Hip-Hurry!" itself is not.
wiley207
9 years ago
I initially thought this was preventing the "Seely Six" Warner Bros. cartoons from coming to DVD (like the first two seasons of "Quick Draw McGraw," or when Rhino initially planned to release the old Gumby shorts on DVD.) But I believe their theatrical rights are different from the television rights. So far we've had three of them released on DVD ("Hip-Hip Hurry" WAS released on VHS in the 1990s, "Road Runner and Wile E. Coyote's Crash Course"), and I will say the music seemed to work rather well with "Hook, Line and Stinker," compared to the others (ESPECIALLY that crappy "Pre-Hysterical Hare.")

Quite a few of the Capitol Hi-Q music cues, particularly ones composed by Jack Shaindlin and Phil Green, are now part of the APM library, so maybe some of those rights have been transferred.
I remember the "Television's Greatest Hits" album from 1985 re-recorded the "Donna Reed Show" and "Dennis the Menace" themes due to them originally being Capitol Hi-Q music cues (the "Captain Kangaroo" theme, "Puffin' Billy," also got remade due to it being a stock music cue as well.)
This even happened with Golden Book Video in the mid-80s, but not with Capitol's music. Their opening logo from 1985 originally used a modified KPM stock music cue, "Prestige Logo (a)" by Paddy Kingsland, but I guess to avoid having to pay the royalties each time they released a new VHS under that banner, in mid-1986 they replaced that music with a sound-alike fanfare that was apparently an original composition that was then used for the rest of the logo's usage (until 1996, at least!)
Justin Delbert
9 years ago
Theatrical rights are WAAAAYYYYY different than TV rights. When you make a theatrical right to use music, this also includes home use as perhaps someone could rent a 16mm copy for an event such as a school viewing or church viewing.

Nobody ever had any thoughts of releasing TV shows for home use way back then. So there would be no rights for home use, just broadcast. That said, Gumby was a TV show. How were they able to clear the music now and put some of them on DVD? It's a smaller company. That's confusing.
nickramer
9 years ago
I just recently realized that an animated segment from "Sesame Street" had some Capitol Hi-Q music. It was "The villain in the Pamela hat" bit and that was released in several formats (including a CD-I software title).
wiley207
9 years ago

I just recently realized that an animated segment from "Sesame Street" had some Capitol Hi-Q music. It was "The villain in the Pamela hat" bit and that was released in several formats (including a CD-I software title).

Originally Posted by: nickramer 



Very interesting! I do know a few Sesame Street films and animated inserts used stock music. The classic "Making Crayons" film uses a KPM music cue, for example, along with a 70s animated segment about a boy showing his body parts.
nickramer
9 years ago

I just recently realized that an animated segment from "Sesame Street" had some Capitol Hi-Q music. It was "The villain in the Pamela hat" bit and that was released in several formats (including a CD-I software title).

Originally Posted by: wiley207 



Very interesting! I do know a few Sesame Street films and animated inserts used stock music. The classic "Making Crayons" film uses a KPM music cue, for example, along with a 70s animated segment about a boy showing his body parts.

Originally Posted by: nickramer 



Off-topic, but the animated segment you mention gave me the creeps as a child. I never mention this to anyone but it scared me so much, that it was the reason why I stopped watching the show for a long time (plus, I was nine and it was pretty much time for me to move on).
Pokey J.Anti-Blockhead
8 years ago

Theatrical rights are WAAAAYYYYY different than TV rights. When you make a theatrical right to use music, this also includes home use as perhaps someone could rent a 16mm copy for an event such as a school viewing or church viewing.

Nobody ever had any thoughts of releasing TV shows for home use way back then. So there would be no rights for home use, just broadcast. That said, Gumby was a TV show. How were they able to clear the music now and put some of them on DVD? It's a smaller company. That's confusing.

Originally Posted by: Justin Delbert 



Very well said.
Mac
  • Mac
  • Advanced Member
8 years ago

I just recently realized that an animated segment from "Sesame Street" had some Capitol Hi-Q music. It was "The villain in the Pamela hat" bit and that was released in several formats (including a CD-I software title).

Originally Posted by: nickramer 



Very interesting! I do know a few Sesame Street films and animated inserts used stock music. The classic "Making Crayons" film uses a KPM music cue, for example, along with a 70s animated segment about a boy showing his body parts.

Originally Posted by: wiley207 



Off-topic, but the animated segment you mention gave me the creeps as a child. I never mention this to anyone but it scared me so much, that it was the reason why I stopped watching the show for a long time (plus, I was nine and it was pretty much time for me to move on).

Originally Posted by: nickramer 



Wait when you say 'body parts' do you mean his guts and stuff? That would've freaked me out as a kid too.
nickramer
8 years ago

I just recently realized that an animated segment from "Sesame Street" had some Capitol Hi-Q music. It was "The villain in the Pamela hat" bit and that was released in several formats (including a CD-I software title).

Originally Posted by: Mac 



Very interesting! I do know a few Sesame Street films and animated inserts used stock music. The classic "Making Crayons" film uses a KPM music cue, for example, along with a 70s animated segment about a boy showing his body parts.

Originally Posted by: nickramer 



Off-topic, but the animated segment you mention gave me the creeps as a child. I never mention this to anyone but it scared me so much, that it was the reason why I stopped watching the show for a long time (plus, I was nine and it was pretty much time for me to move on).

Originally Posted by: wiley207 



Wait when you say 'body parts' do you mean his guts and stuff? That would've freaked me out as a kid too.

Originally Posted by: nickramer 



No, nothing like that ("Sesame Street" wouldn't approved it). A boy would name his body parts and a dark circle would cover it for a few seconds. Just look up "A boy names his body parts" on Youtube. Here's a picture of the segment: http://muppet.wikia.com/wiki/File:1037c.jpg
Yowp
8 years ago

"Hip Hip-Hurry!" was one of two Road Runner cartoons that used Capitol Hi-Q stock music.

The Latin-name introduction for this cartoon was later used to introduce the 19-minute Road Runner segment in the Bugs Bunny Road-Runner Movie. During this short time, the Capitol stock music can still be heard, before abruptly cutting to the score for "Zoom and Bored".

Did Jones (or WB) have to pay any royalties to Capitol because of the music? Or did a client have to use a certain amount of stock music before payments were required? Or did Capitol not know or (if they did) not care?

The Bugs Bunny Road Runner Movie, after all, has been out on DVD for years, without any problems, but "Hip Hip-Hurry!" itself is not.

Originally Posted by: Toadette 



Sorry, Toadette, I'm rarely on forums any more so I would have responded sooner if I saw this.

I don't have a definitive answer. It depends on the contract Warners had with Capitol (yes, Capitol had to be paid) and I don't know what that was. It might have been on a per-cue basis. It may have leased the entire library. I'm sure the fee schedule was different for theatrical use than it was for television. And Warners would still have to submit a cue sheet to ASCAP so the composers got paid.

I keep reading about Jack Shaindlin and Hi-Q. Shaindlin had nothing to do with Capitol and his music was never in its libraries (nor is it heard in Warners cartoons). Shaindlin was involved with a company called Langlois Filmusic. It was one of a number of companies that sold stock music that can be heard in Hanna-Barbera TV cartoons, Gumby stop-motions, some John Sutherland shorts and in theatrical newsreels. Someone who didn't know what he was talking about lumped it in with Hi-Q years ago on the internet and I thought the late Earl Kress straightened that out. Evidently not.

Yowp





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